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Unit 6: Purpose of American Government

Page history last edited by Pete Scholtes 11 years, 2 months ago

 

Summary: This unit is about the founding of the United States and its Constitution between 1776 and 1790. In this unit, you will explore the origins of American democracy. You will put into your own words the meaning of the Declaration of Independence of 1776, signed during the Revolutionary War. You will describe the debate between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the 1780s, and how their compromises shaped the U.S. Constitution. Finally, you will explain how state and federal government share power through federalism, how different branches of government "check" each other, and how the legislative branch passes laws.

 

Week 22

__Mon. Feb. 11: 1.) Get Unit 6 Checklist and Terms, and copy Unit 6 Terms (2 points). Civ and Econ Unit 6 Checklist.doc Unit 6 Terms Key.doc Define: heritage: traditions passed down from generation to generation. legislature: people elected to make laws. charter: document creating a government. tyranny: abuse of power. 2.) While doing that, show notebook for Terms points (if you haven't) (6 points for Unit 5), turn in Unit 5 Study Guide (6 points for Unit 5). 3.) Brief introduction to Unit 6. 4.) Small-group discussion and class activity: Lesson 1, p. 4-6, in We the People, p. 4-6. (2 points) 5.) Class review of monarchy, dictatorship, and democracy. Learning goal: Explain popular sovereignty (consent of the governed) as the source of legitimate governmental authority in a representative democracy or republic.

__Tue., Feb. 12: 1.) Review Personal Finance Test. 2.) Define in Terms: direct democracy: laws made by citizens at town meetings. republic: government where citizens elect representatives to make laws. natural rights: rights you're born with. separation of powers: dividing government into three branches. 3.) Complete "Roots of Democracy" Worksheet (3 points). If everyone finishes early, we'll watch a movie excerpt: The Patriot or National Treasure. Learning goal: Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents: natural rights philosophy, social contract, civic virtue, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, representative democracy, political factions, federalism and individual rights.

__Wed., Feb. 13: Reading 1: Ch. 4, Sec. 3: "Moving Toward Nationhood," p. 77-83  (3 points). Unit 6 Reading 1.ppt Get Homework A: "How Thomas Jefferson Got the Job" OR "Roots of American Government" worksheet (3 points). Questions for reading: 1. Define in your Terms: compact: agreement to make and obey laws. constitution: written plan of government. ratification: approval. (Rotation 1: Go over "Roots of Democracy" and add these terms: direct democracy: laws made by citizens at town meetings. republic: government where citizens elect representatives to make laws. natural rights: rights you're born with. separation of powers: dividing government into three branches.) Answer questions in notebook: 2. Why did the colonies rebel against England? 3. After declaring independence, how did the Americans organize their state and national governments? 4. Why did many Americans think that the national government under the Articles of Confederation was too weak? 5. How did their experience under English rule make it difficult for Americans to form a strong national government? Learning goal: Analyze the American revolutionaries' justifications, principles and ideals as expressed in the Declaration of Independence; identify the sources of these principles and ideals and their impact on subsequent revolutions in Europe, the Caribbean, and Latin America.

__Thu., Feb. 14:  We have school, but no class: Experiential Half-Day

 

Week 23

__Mon., Feb. 18: No School: Presidents Day

__Tue., Feb. 19: 1.) Declaration of Independence Worksheet (3 points). For students seeking elective social studies credit outside of class: optional "Teenage Stereotypes" project. 2.) Get Homework A: "How Thomas Jefferson Got the Job" OR "Roots of American Government" worksheet (3 points). Learning goal: Analyze the American revolutionaries' justifications, principles and ideals as expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

__Wed., Feb. 20: "Constitutional Convention" lecture and worksheet (3 points). Add new Term:

bicameral: two-house legislature. If there's time and everyone's on task, we'll watch an excerpt from the HBO film John Addams. Learning goal: Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents.

__Thu., Feb. 21: Reading 2: "What was the Anti-Federalist Position?" Get questions in class and write answers in notebook (3 points). (For background: Ch. 5, Sec. 2: "The Struggle for Ratification," p. 96-99.) Unit 6 Reading 2.ppt

__Fri., Feb. 22: Progress Friday: Check grades and update checklist.

 

Week 24

__Mon., Feb. 25: Constitution Preamble video and worksheet (3 points). Preamble Starter Worksheet.docx Video Worksheet.docx Define tomorrow's terms: bill: proposed law. veto: president rejecting a bill proposed by Congress. delegated powers: powers given to Congress. amendments: changes or additions. federalism: power divided between state and federal governments. concurrent powers: powers shared by state and federal governments. reserved powers: powers reserved for the states. checks and balances: each branch of government limits the powers of the other two. impeach: the House accuses president of wrongdoing. Learning goals: Paraphrase the preamble of the Constitution. Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I, the executive branch as enumerated in Article II, and the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the United States Constitution.

__Tue., Feb. 26: Reading 3: Ch. 5, Sec. 3: "The Supreme Law of the Land," p. 100-105. Get questions in class: Unit 6 Reading 3 Questions.doc

__Wed., Feb. 27: "Checks and Balances" worksheet (3 points).

__Thu., Feb. 28: Finish reading and Checks and Balances worksheet from past two days (many students were testing). Review and correct. Students who are done may watch National Treasure. Some students may begin "Where in the Constitution?" worksheet. Homework B will be canceled if everyone finishes today.

 

Week 25

__Mon., Mar. 4: 1.) Define these Terms for tomorrow and do Vocabulary Matching/Crossword: Unit 6 Vocabulary Matching.doc Unit 6 Crossword.pdf lobbyists: People who represent interest groups. Speaker of the House: Presides over House of Representatives. floor leaders: Chief officers of each party in Congress. whips: Assistants to the floor leaders. 2.) Checks and Balances review lecture: Checks and Balances Review.ppt 3.)  "We Write the Laws."  Learning goal: Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution.

__Tue., Mar 5: SNOW DAY! NO SCHOOL. 

__Wed., Mar. 6: Legislative Branch activity and review (4 points). Review Day Unit 6.ppt Watch I'm Just a Bill: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-eYBZFEzf8 Get and complete Study Guide. Unit 6 Study Guide.doc Unit 6 Terms Key.doc Learning goal: Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution.

__Thu., Mar. 7: UNIT 6 TEST (100 points). Unit 6 review (2 points): Purpose of U.S. Government Millionaire (need to remake this). Show completed Terms (6 points). Turn in STUDY GUIDE (6 points). Begin Unit 7.

 


 Suggested related projects you can do during PBL (Pete has materials for them):

Elective projects:

  • Declaration of Independence from Teenage Stereotypes (see Pete for details)

 


Unit 5 Learning goals:

__Compare the philosophies, structures and operations of different types of governments in other countries with those in the United States. For example: Different types of governments-monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships, representative governments.

__Identify the sources of governmental authority; explain popular sovereignty (consent of the governed) as the source of legitimate governmental authority in a representative democracy or republic.

__Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents: natural rights philosophy, social contract, civic virtue, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, representative democracy, political factions, federalism and individual rights. For example: Documents-Mayflower Compact, English Bill of Rights, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the Constitution, selected Federalist Papers (such as 10, 39, 51, 78), the Bill of Rights.

__Analyze the American revolutionaries' justifications, principles and ideals as expressed in the Declaration of Independence; identify the sources of these principles and ideals and their impact on subsequent revolutions in Europe, the Caribbean, and Latin America. (Revolution

and a New Nation: 1754-1800)

__Explain federalism and the provisions of the United States Constitution which delegate to the federal government the powers necessary to fulfill the purposes for which it was established; distinguish between those powers and the powers retained by the people and the states. For example: Necessary and Proper Clause ("elastic clause"), Commerce Clause, Ninth and Tenth Amendments.

__Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution.

__Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the United States Constitution.

__Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the United States Constitution.

__Describe the systems of enumerated and implied powers, separation of powers and checks and balances.

__Evaluate the importance of an independent judiciary, judicial review and the rule of law.

__Analyze the arguments about the organization and powers of the federal government between 1783 and 1800, including the debates over the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights; explain the origins of the two-party political system and the significance of the election of 1800.

 

Review these learning goals:

__Demonstrate skills that enable people to monitor and influence state, local and national affairs. For example: Working with others; conducting civil conversations; articulating ideas and interests; negotiating differences and managing conflict with people or groups who have different perspectives; using parliamentary procedures; building consensus.

__Evaluate sources of information and various forms of political persuasion for validity, accuracy, ideology, emotional appeals, bias and prejudice.

 

Preview these learning goals:

__Describe the purposes, types, and sources of laws and rules. For example: Types of laws-civil, criminal and juvenile. Sources of laws and rules-case, statutory, administrative, executive.

__Explain how tribal sovereignty establishes a unique relationship between American Indian Nations and the United States government.

 


 

Instructor: Peter Scholtes

peter.scholtes@academic-arts.org

651.457.7427

Class website: http://petehumanities.pbworks.com/

 

 

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